Lower Esopus Stream Management Plan

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Please visit this complete public outreach website regarding the project to learn more details about the planning process, and progress, and to view an interactive map of the Lower Esopus Creek and the surrounding area.




The Lower Esopus Creek meanders through the picturesque Towns of Olive, Marbletown, Hurley, Ulster, and Saugerties, along with the City of Kingston and the Village of Saugerties. The creek extends for over 32 miles, from the Ashokan Reservoir’s dam to the Hudson River. A vast 163-square-mile area feeds the creek through smaller creeks and streams.

Historically, the Esopus was a single, unbroken river system from Winnisook Lake to the Hudson, but changes like the reservoir’s construction and evolving land-use and development patterns have left their mark on the creek. While recent concerns like flooding and increased amounts of sediment have rightly garnered attention, the Lower Esopus represents more than a source of challenges.

It’s a cherished asset to the communities the creek touches and the local ecosystems it sustains. The Lower Esopus Creek and the area around it are home to pristine streams, wetlands, lakes, and ponds supporting abundant wildlife. The forests and floodplains of the Lower Esopus provide numerous benefits, including flood control, water storage, support for biodiversity, and opportunities for education and recreation for residents and tourists, alike.

The Stream Management Plan for the Lower Esopus Creek aims to empower our communities to preserve and enhance these invaluable resources.The bridge over the creek at the Ashokan Center, Town of Olive

This project is funded by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection through an “Order on Consent” that requires the agency to fund Environmental Benefit Projects to address impacts associated with cloudy, muddy water in the stream. Upon completion of the plan, $2,000,000 in implementation funds will be used for projects identified in the plan, managed through the Hudson River Foundation for Science and Environmental Research.

The goals of the Lower Esopus Stream Management Plan (SMP) project are to:

  • Engage and inspire the public and interested parties in identifying problems, opportunities, and an overall vision for the Lower Esopus Creek.

  • Synthesize, articulate, and expand the current knowledge base regarding the Lower Esopus Creek.

  • Create a management plan that specifically addresses issues identified by the Lower Esopus Creek Advisory Council (LECAC) and the broader public through a planning process that addresses such issues as recreational access, ecological flows, education, and natural communities.

  • Create an implementation plan, with suggested projects and estimated costs.

Marbletown Town ParkPhase 1 of this project will lead to the development of the management plan, summarizing data and recommendations for the stream corridor. To date, Phase 1 has included a public survey and public meeting, with a second public meeting planned for December.

Phase 2 will develop the implementation plan identifying projects for the Lower Esopus Creek and will include additional opportunities for public input.

Tina Chorvas Memorial Waterfront Park in Saugerties


Please visit this complete public outreach website regarding the project to learn more details about the planning process, and progress, and to view an interactive map of the Lower Esopus Creek and the surrounding area.




The Lower Esopus Creek meanders through the picturesque Towns of Olive, Marbletown, Hurley, Ulster, and Saugerties, along with the City of Kingston and the Village of Saugerties. The creek extends for over 32 miles, from the Ashokan Reservoir’s dam to the Hudson River. A vast 163-square-mile area feeds the creek through smaller creeks and streams.

Historically, the Esopus was a single, unbroken river system from Winnisook Lake to the Hudson, but changes like the reservoir’s construction and evolving land-use and development patterns have left their mark on the creek. While recent concerns like flooding and increased amounts of sediment have rightly garnered attention, the Lower Esopus represents more than a source of challenges.

It’s a cherished asset to the communities the creek touches and the local ecosystems it sustains. The Lower Esopus Creek and the area around it are home to pristine streams, wetlands, lakes, and ponds supporting abundant wildlife. The forests and floodplains of the Lower Esopus provide numerous benefits, including flood control, water storage, support for biodiversity, and opportunities for education and recreation for residents and tourists, alike.

The Stream Management Plan for the Lower Esopus Creek aims to empower our communities to preserve and enhance these invaluable resources.The bridge over the creek at the Ashokan Center, Town of Olive

This project is funded by the New York City Department of Environmental Protection through an “Order on Consent” that requires the agency to fund Environmental Benefit Projects to address impacts associated with cloudy, muddy water in the stream. Upon completion of the plan, $2,000,000 in implementation funds will be used for projects identified in the plan, managed through the Hudson River Foundation for Science and Environmental Research.

The goals of the Lower Esopus Stream Management Plan (SMP) project are to:

  • Engage and inspire the public and interested parties in identifying problems, opportunities, and an overall vision for the Lower Esopus Creek.

  • Synthesize, articulate, and expand the current knowledge base regarding the Lower Esopus Creek.

  • Create a management plan that specifically addresses issues identified by the Lower Esopus Creek Advisory Council (LECAC) and the broader public through a planning process that addresses such issues as recreational access, ecological flows, education, and natural communities.

  • Create an implementation plan, with suggested projects and estimated costs.

Marbletown Town ParkPhase 1 of this project will lead to the development of the management plan, summarizing data and recommendations for the stream corridor. To date, Phase 1 has included a public survey and public meeting, with a second public meeting planned for December.

Phase 2 will develop the implementation plan identifying projects for the Lower Esopus Creek and will include additional opportunities for public input.

Tina Chorvas Memorial Waterfront Park in Saugerties


Questions on the Stream Management Plan

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Page last updated: 11 Apr 2024, 02:43 PM